The public is invited to join us at The National Park Store for a series of engaging programs

Saturday, February 4

Monumental Places

This program as made possible by Arizona Humanities

Presented by: Greg McNamee

12 PM & 2 PM

Arizona was one of the earliest parts of the United States to contribute to the national park system; even as a territory, Grand Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, Casa Grande Ruins, and other sites were recognized as being critically important parts of the national patrimony, and their incorporation into the national system led to Arizona’s leadership in domestic tourism for generations.

Gregory McNamee explores the history of the national park system, with special attention to how it came to bear on Arizona—a relationship that is ongoing, as witness the recent addition of the Agua Fria National Monument to the system and the proposed conversion of Sonoran Desert National Monument into Sonoran Desert National Park.

This informative, entertaining talk should be of interest to anyone who has visited one of Arizona’s national parks, monuments, or historic sites, and to anyone who is contemplating doing so.

For reservations, please call 520-622-6014 during business hours, beginning one week prior to the event.

 

 

Saturday, February 18

Mythical River: Chasing the Mirage of New Water in the American Southwest

This program was made possible by Arizona Humanities

Presented by: Melissa Sevigny

12 PM & 2 PM

In a lyrical mix of natural science, history, and memoir, Melissa L. Sevigny ponders what it means to make a home in the American Southwest at a time when its most essential resource, water, is overexploited and undervalued. Mythical River takes the reader on a historical sojourn into the story of the Buenaventura, an imaginary river that led eighteenth- and nineteenth-century explorers, fur trappers, and emigrants astray for seventy-five years.

This mythical river becomes a metaphor for our modern-day attempts to supply water to a growing population in the Colorado River Basin. Readers encounter a landscape literally remapped by the search for “new” water, where rivers flow uphill, dams and deep wells reshape geography, trees become intolerable competitors for water, and new technologies tap into clouds and oceans.

In contrast to this fantasy of abundance, Sevigny explores acts of restoration. From a dismantled dam in Arizona to an accidental wetland in Mexico, she examines how ecologists, engineers, politicians, and citizens have attempted to secure water for desert ecosystems. In a place scarred by conflict, she shows how recognizing the rights of rivers is a path toward water security.

Ultimately, Sevigny writes a new map for the future of the American Southwest, a vision of a society that accepts the desert’s limits in exchange for an intimate relationship with the natural world.

For reservations, please call 520-622-6014 during business hours, beginning one week prior to the event.

Includes a field trip to Catalina State Park

Saturday, March 4

History and Wildlife of Saguaro National Park a panel discussion featuring Jane Eppinga and wildlife biologist, Jessica Lamberton-Moreno.

This program was made possible by Arizona Humanities

 

Presented by: Jane Eppinga and Jessica Lamberton-Moreno

12 PM & 2 PM

Eppinga’s content will be based on her book Saguaro National Park (Images of America). Her writing tells the story of the Organic Act of 1916 creating the NPS, the subsequent designation of Tucson’s iconic National Monument by Herbert Hoover in 1933, and the legislation that enlarged the park in 1994. Along with Jessica Lamberton-Moreno, the discussion will highlight the variety of natural resources, and creatures in the park.

For reservations, please call 520-622-6014 during business hours, beginning one week prior to the event.
Saturday, April 1


National Park Agriculture and Heritage Food Stories

This program was made possible by Arizona Humanities

 

Presented by: Greg McNamee

12 PM & 2 PM

Consider the taco, that favorite treat, a staple of Mexican and Mexican American cooking and an old standby on an Arizonan’s plate. The corn in the tortilla comes from the Valley of Mexico, the cheese from Anatolia, the lettuce from Egypt, the onion from Syria, the pinto beans from central Mexico, the tomatoes and peppers from the Caribbean coast, the chicken (optional, of course) from Indochina, the beef (ditto) from the steppes of Eurasia.

Add a chimichanga, that Arizona invention, and you introduce wheat from what is now northern Iraq into the mix. Add rice, and you travel to East China; add olives, and the eastern Mediterranean comes into view. The foods of Arizona speak to the many cultures, native and newcomer, that make up our state.

Join Gregory McNamee, the author of Moveable Feasts: The History, Science, and Lore of Food and many other books, in exploring these many traditions.

For reservations, please call 520-622-6014 during business hours, beginning one week prior to the event.